Tag Archives: Abraham 1

Enoch/Noah and Melchizedek/Abraham

Today’s study in the perpetual quest to understand priesthood, Abrahamic Covenant, and so forth, focused on the phrase “Prince of Peace.”

It only comes up a few times in scripture, and to me, seems to indicate someone who has created or can create peace in a city. Enoch created peace and so created a Zion. Melchizedek created peace and also had a Zion-like city.

The JST of Gen 14:33, 36 talks about Melchizedek being called a Prince of Peace because of the work he did, and so does Alma 13:18.

Several places in scripture also talk about Enoch and those called after his order being given powers over the mountains, rivers, etc. — and Enoch used these powers to defend his Zion city. They didn’t fight; the earth just diverted the opposing army and they didn’t need to fight!

Today, also, I was comparing Enoch’s effect on Noah to Melchizedek’s effect on Abraham. I have noted that Noah’s time was so wicked in part because Enoch had spent over 300 years gathering the righteous into Zion, and by Noah’s time the city had been removed from the earth. So Noah was working with those who were left/descendants of those who were left.

But, Noah needed to stay on the earth, because someone needed to preserve the work of preaching the gospel through the generations. The families of the earth, the generations of the earth, needed someone around! And there was a promise to Enoch that his seed would be the chosen seed, which means that his seed would always been found on the earth until the end of the world.

So, Noah was needed on earth and not in Zion.

If we compare this situation to Abraham, I think we’ll find it similar in many ways. We read in the Bible and in revealed LDS scripture that Abraham and Melchizedek were alive at the same time. Abraham paid tithes to Melchizedek. But we also read that Melchizedek created a Zion-like city. (Alma 13:18 and JST of Genesis 14 are good places to read.) If Abraham was yearning after a new place to live (see Abraham 1), and if he was a righteous man that God approved of, why didn’t Abraham join Melchizedek’s city?

But again, let’s compare this to Noah and Enoch. We don’t read that Melchizedek’s city was taken to heaven, but whether it was or not they were a city separated out from the other nations. Perhaps Abraham’s role was similar to Noah’s — we  need someone to wander about and teach the gospel; we need someone to preserve the gospel for future generations; we need someone to continue to be the chosen seed and bear children of that chosen seed.

So perhaps like Noah, Abraham was needed on earth and not in Zion.

This could be why God says to Abraham: “As it was with Noah, so shall it be with thee” (Ab. 1:18).

In some ways, that also sounds like Adam and Eve. They could have stayed in Eden, but they wouldn’t have born children and had a chance to learn of and preach the gospel. (There are complications there.) But anyway, their work outside Eden is similar to Noah and Abraham. Proclaim the gospel, preserve the gospel to their children, and watch over a chosen seed.

 


An interpretation of Abraham 1:4

I was reviewing Abraham 1 and verse 4 changed for me:

I sought for mine appointment unto the Priesthood according to the appointment of God unto the fathers concerning the seed.

Now who knows if this is right, but I read it in a new way this morning. Something like: “I sought for my turn to be ordained to the priesthood, because of the promise of God unto the fathers that their seed would hold the priesthood to bless all the earth.” His immediate fathers had all gone astray worshiping idols, so Abraham even had to seek it. Otherwise it would have been given to him naturally, in the natural course of things. But in his case, he had to learn about it, study it, decide, and seek it. But what he was seeking was something already promised to him, but his immediate family wasn’t going to give to him.

He was supposed to be the next link in the chain, but his father thought that Egypt had the right priesthood authority instead. Remember that the Egyptians fain claimed it from Noah, and Abraham’s father believed him. I wonder when the first weak link happened. Who was the first in Abraham’s family to believe the Egyptians had it? Was it Abraham’s father, grand father, great grand father, or who? Did Melchizedek live a very, very long time since he was king of a Zion city that was translated at some point? Was Melchizedek far back in Abraham’s genealogy?

And why were people so excited to find a priesthood genealogy that went back through Ham? Was it just that the Egyptians had built a giant society so it appeared that they had power and must have the right priesthood? Was it the case that those who didn’t want to live in a Zion way didn’t join Melchizedek, and over time their descendants sought for what looked like the priesthood but without consecration? That’s a harsh thing to say perhaps but it might be human nature?

Anyway, I think it’s worth hanging on to this possible reading from verse 4. What was sought was not just that he could have the promise of God concerning the seed (which is how I had read it before), but what was sought was the priesthood, because he of the promise given to his ancestors concerning their seed.


Two random notes from Abraham 1

I’ve always liked and wondered about verse 19. Why will Abraham be like Noah? I’ve assumed it primarily meant that he will be a sort of dispensation head, a new beginning. I also thought about how Noah’s immediate fathers weren’t so righteous, just like Abraham. Yesterday I was looking through some of the verses that follow and I remembered again that Noah comes up several times in the discussion of Pharaoh and priesthood. I think verse 19 might be saying, “You will actually be like Noah, whereas the Egyptians ‘fain claim’ they are like Noah.” (See verse 27). I like that reading for now.

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I’ve also wondered about this little genealogy lesson about Egyptus and Ham and this woman and Pharaoh. It never seems to work out — it sounds like Egyptus is both Ham’s wife and daughter, and somehow the blood of the Canaanites is preserved through all of this? Fortunately Joe has lots of books on scripture so I looked through the textual history book with all the variants from journals, newspapers, etc. I couldn’t believe how many different sources we have available! Most of them do not differ significantly, but it was fun to look at. In one of these the genealogy problem was simplified, but only in one of them. But it did make me think that maybe “daughter of Ham” could mostly be read “female descendant of Ham” and that would solve part of that problem already. 

Joe told me to also look at the Kirtland Egyptian Papers, and also at Hugh Nibley’s many books (particularly Abraham in Egypt and his Pearl of Great Price lectures). I’m always happy and a bit disappointed when I find out there are resources to go and work on. 🙂 I don’t have the research drive that Joe and Kim have, but I am thrilled to know there is more information to work with.